Photo Credit
Photo courtesy of Paul Alaback, University of Montana.

Wild strawberry

Scientific name
Fragaria virginiana
Also Known As
C, Common strawberry, Heart berry, Virginia strawberry, Woods strawberry
Plant Family
Plant Group
Known as ode'imin by the Ojibwe. The wild strawberry is similar to the cultivated strawberry, but has much smaller berries! Look at the three teeth on the tips of the leaves. Wild strawberry has a small central tooth and longer teeth on each side.
Identification Hints

The wild strawberry is similar to the cultivated strawberry, but has much smaller berries! Look at the three teeth on the tips of the leaves. Wild strawberry has a small central tooth and longer teeth on each side.

Did You Know?

Indigenous peoples throughout parts of Canada picked and ate the savory fruit of this plant. Midwestern prairie and Great Lakes tribes, such as the Omaha, Hidatsa, Mandan, Dakota, Pawnee, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, and the Winnebago ate these strawberries raw, cooked or dried. The Winnebago and Blackfoot made a tea with an infusion of the young leaves of this plant. The Ojibwe used root of Fragaria virginiana to treat "cholera infantum" and stomach aches. Also, plant attracts wildlife and butterflies.

Leaves
The leaves are thin, with toothed edges, and appear in leaflets of 3. Hairy stems grow up to 6 in (15 cm) long.
Flowers
Flowers have 5 white petals, with numerous yellow pistils and stamens in the center.
Fruits
A small red, edible, berry.
Habitat
Natural habitat is in meadows and forest openings, at higher elevations where a good frost occurs.
Bloom Time
Late spring (May), depending on location.
States
AK, AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY