Photo Credit
Photo courtesy of Silver Lake Nature Center.

White clover

Scientific name
Trifolium repens
Plant Family
Plant Group
White clover can be distinguished from the others by its white flowers, three leaflets with rounded tips, more than 5 flowers per stem, and its creeping habit.
Identification Hints

White clover can be distinguished from other clovers by its white flowers, three leaflets with rounded tips, more than 5 flowers per stem, and its creeping habit.

Did You Know?

Trifolium repens, like other members of the pea family, fix nitrogen (a limiting factor in plant growth). This makes clover an important agricultural and rangeland plant-by planting it with grasses it is possible to increase the grass yield. Clover leaves and flowers are also good forage for wildlife, such as moose, grizzly bear, white-tailed deer, and blue grouse. Clover is used widely by bees to produce honey.

Leaves
Palmately (fan-shaped) compound (divided), with three teardrop-shaped (obovate) leaflets each 0.20 to 1.18 in (0.5 to 3 cm).
Flowers
Grouped in terminal inflorescences that are 0.39 to 1.18 in (1 to 3 cm) wide. Each flower is white to white-pink, a typical pea flower, and 0.20 to 0.47 in (5 to 12 mm) wide.
Fruits
White clover flowers eventually form small, brown seedpods that droop downwards. Each pod contains several seeds.
Habitat
White clover grows in a wide range of habitats, from shaded woodlands to open meadows and disturbed roadsides. Thrives in full sunlight and moist, deep soils.
Bloom Time
: April to December.
States
AK, AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, WY