Photo Credit
Photo courtesy of Patrick J. Alexander, USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

Scarlet gilia

Scientific name
Ipomopsis aggregata
Also Known As
Foxfire
Plant Family
Plant Group
Scarlet gilias have bright red tubular flowers that attach to one side of the stem. The stems are often sticky feeling and slightly hairy. The leaves are simple and alternate along the stems.
Identification Hints

Scarlet gilias have bright red tubular flowers that attach to one side of the stem. The stems are often sticky feeling and slightly hairy. The leaves are simple and alternate along the stems.

Did You Know?

In many populations of Scarlet gilia in Colorado, bumble bees rob flowers of their nectar without effectively pollinating the flowers or transferring pollen to other plants. Nectar-robbing decreases seed production in these populations, in which more 80% of the flowers may have their nectar stolen!

Leaves
Leaves are simple and alternately arranged along the stems, the lower leaves larger than the higher ones. The leaves at the very base of the plant are arranged in a “rosette” at ground level; the flowering stems emerge from this rosette. The rosettes’ leaves are 1.25 to 2 in (3 to 5 cm) long with 9 to 11 lobes; the leaves attached to the erect stems have 5 to 7 lobes, and may be smooth or hairy.
Flowers
The bright red, tubular flowers are borne along one side of the flowering stems, each of which produce 1 to 7 flowers. The base of each floral tube displays pointed green calyx lobes; the pointed, bright red petals curve backwards from the opening of the tube. Flowers bloom from April to June.
Fruits
Scarlet gilia fruits are small oval shaped capsules.
Habitat
Scarlet gilia is widespread in openings of scrub and woodlands from 3600 to 10800 ft (1100 to 3300 m).
States
AZ, CA, CO, ID, MT, NM, NV, OK, OR, TX, UT, WA, WY